Presentation: Making Accessible Content and Websites in WordPress

Presented at the Cowichan Valley WordPress August 2018 Meetup. This presentation was all about web accessibility, thinking about the users affected, technology involved, creating accessible content in WordPress, and finally, choosing accessible themes and plugins.

The first part of the presentation is pretty much a rehash of previous presentations, the second part on content is similar but focuses specifically on WordPress. The last part is almost all new content specific to WordPress.
Continue reading “Presentation: Making Accessible Content and Websites in WordPress”

Presentation: Auditing Your Website for Accessibility Compliance and Understanding How ADA Applies

This was presented as a webinar on August 16, 2018 for the Florida Libraries Webinars program. Continue reading “Presentation: Auditing Your Website for Accessibility Compliance and Understanding How ADA Applies”

Making Your Website Accessible Part 4: WCAG 2.1

The latest revision of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), version 2.1, was recently published. While it’s a few years old, I still often refer to my series of blog posts that break down WCAG 2.0 because unlike many of my other articles on web accessibility, it refers to the WCAG criteria by number. This extra part to the series is to specifically cover what’s new in WCAG 2.1. Continue reading “Making Your Website Accessible Part 4: WCAG 2.1”

Article: A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility

What’s that? Why yes, it’s another article! Open-access, peer-reviewed article, this time written more for the content creator (as opposed to the developer).

Check it out issue no. 7 of Weave: Journal of Library User Experience.

Copy of abstract

This article is intended to provide guidance on making library websites and other digital content accessible within the constraints of most organizations’ technological environments. Accessibility can mean different things depending on the context, but the focus in this article is on web accessibility, which the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) defines as “enabling people with disabilities to participate equally on the Web” (W3C, 2016). Many existing articles provide an overview of the big picture aspects of accessibility, including benefits to the organization, legislation, statistics , and general principles. The focus of this piece is on specific best practices and guidelines, as well as their benefits for content creators, who frequently have limited access to edit digital content and cannot always apply recommended solutions that assume full control and access.

Thank you

So glad this article is now published.

Article: A Practical Starter Guide on Developing Accessible Websites

After years of prepping and months of writing and editing, I finally published my first article!

The article is focused on accessibility and assumes that you are a web developer or can understand web development to at least an intermediate level. The idea was to fill a bit of a gap since so many accessibility guides focus on the most basic, usually content bits, and we wanted to go a step further.

Published July 18, 2017 in Issue 37 of the Code4Lib Journal, authored by myself and Michael Schofield: A Practical Starter Guide on Developing Accessible Websites.

Yay!

happy quokka

Presentation: Making Web Services Accessible for Everyone

This morning , I did another presentation for the Florida Libraries Webinars group. The first time was focused on web content, while this time was focused on overall design and structure. Continue reading “Presentation: Making Web Services Accessible for Everyone”

DAISY Production: A Vision for the Future

Previously, I wrote an overview of accessible production based on how a couple of different organizations produce accessible books. In the future, hopefully production will be simplified as devices are updated to support new standards and some of the standards are finalized. Continue reading “DAISY Production: A Vision for the Future”

BCLA Pre-Conference Notes: Why Accessible Library Service Matters in Public Libraries

Disability Awareness Training for Library Staff Summary

Margarete Wiedemann, North Vancouver City Public Library

  • last Canadian census: 1 in 7 Canadians live with a disability
  • public libraries are generally accessible to a degree
  • survey findings: what is helpful: online catalogue, home delivery, plain language,
  • barriers: physical envionrment, time on computer, standing in line, crowded seating, cognitive demands, asking for help and feeling like taking too much time, confusing signage, patronize/impatient/insensitive staff
  • solutions to barriers example: baskets with wheels, walkers for in-library use
  • some of the most difficult barriers with disabilities is people’s attitudes: need to think about what you say and write; person first language
  • Social-Ecological Model of Disability: disability is a difference, arises from interactions between individual and society, and remedy is a change in interactions and context
  • paradigm shift to full citizens with human rights, integrated, included, partipants.
  • communication tips: speak directly and clearly, make eye contact at eye level, show respect and patience, show and tell or walk and talk, ask for help if you are having difficulty understanding
  • universal design: recognize that there is a large diversity, and changes that benefit all users; fix the environment (not the individual)
  • universal design will cover 80+% of users, and cover the rest using inclusive design and individual accommodations
  • library staff can make a difference
  • just make the connetiion and offer what you have
  • an inclusive library begins with you

survey results: AIG section of the BCLA website

NNELS

  • print disability: anyone that cannot read a book in “traditional” print format is considered print disabled
  • tour of the website
  • notes on formats: DAISY have MP3 inside of them, common format, but not one everyone is familiar with
  • resources: nnels.ca/libraries
  • possible engagement: books for student that are non-curriculum material
  • collections highlight awards and other collections including digitized InterLINK reels of BC audiobooks, Truth and Reconciliation (which is public domain and downloadable by anyone)

Discussions

  • devices: bone induction earphones, raspberry pi, slate and stylus, mp3 audio
  • copyright act allows format shifting for print disabled patrons regardless of copyright of the original version

Mike Edwards – Dyslexic Reader

  • made several attempts at universities
  • fear of feeling stupid, etc.
  • post secondary requires psychological examination: something that you had to prove, that you’re disabled
  • what works: have CNIB worker who keeps feeding books on CD
  • accommodations: colour codes text, TextAloud
  • opportunity for outreach: prisons, large percentage of dyslexics